History

Mission Statement

The History department aims to give students an overview of the world in which they live, and to help them both understand and identify the origins of modern-day British culture and values since 1066. We aim to inspire students’ curiosity about the past, and to equip them with the ability to ask perceptive questions, think critically about the world in which they live, judge and weigh evidence and to develop their own perspective and interpretation of the past. Ultimately our aim is to instil a passion for the past, and to give students a window into their own identity as well as the challenges of their time.

The Four Pillars

Skill

Students can expect to be explicitly taught the key historical skills that will enable them to critically evaluate the past, and effectively engage with both historical sources, as well as modern day sources of information. This is especially key in a world dominated by social media and so called ‘fake news’. These skills include: Chronological understanding, Change and continuity, Cause and Consequence, Significance, and Interpretation

Character

History is also well placed as a subject to develop the character of students who choose to continue their study after year 8. The taught content deals with a variety of social and moral issues which examine many of our Tudor Values, but especially those of tolerance, unity, democracy and respect.

Experiences

Students will be consistently exposed to a variety of different opinions and historical debates, which will broaden their understanding of the world as whole and the diverse range of opinions that exist within it. Students will also be given the opportunity to visit key historical sites, both within school through the use of new technology and outside of school on site visits.  Within class, students will have   the chance to engage with a variety of historical sources, including photos, films and documentaries.

Criticality

Here at the academy students will be exposed to a variety of different viewpoints and are encouraged to develop their own interpretations and opinions about the past, but to respect and understand opinions different to their own. This allows students to critically engage with the past, and deepen their understanding of Historical events.

Overview of Year 7 and 8

Throughout years 7 and 8, students are exposed to a chronological overview of British history since 1066.  Throughout these studies, students are exposed to the impact and development of several key themes on Britain – explicitly the church, society, empire and industrialisation.

Year 7 Units of Study

  • The Norman Conquest
  • Norman Control 1066-1087
  • The Middle Ages
  • The Tudors
  • The British Empire
  • The Slave Trade

Year 8 Units of Study

  • The Industrial Revolution
  • The causes and events of World War One
  • The Rise of Hitler
  • The causes and events of World War Two
  • The Holocaust (International study)
  • Civil Rights in the USA (International study)

Parents can find more information on the specific topics covered in each unit by looking at the learning overviews that are stuck into students’ books at the start of each half term.

Overview of Year 9

History in year 9 follows a scheme of work that represents a foundation year.  It aims to effectively bridge the gap between year 8 and GCSE levels of study, and to develop the skills that students will require to tackle GCSE content while exposing them to fundamentally important historical knowledge.  Year 9 continues to explore the key themes (church, society, empire and industrialisation) introduced during year 7 and 8 through a chronological study of Crime and Punishment in the United Kingdom since 1066.  In this way, students will build on their knowledge of British history that has been taught in year 7 and 8, but with a specific focus on a particular aspect of society.

  • Crime and punishment in medieval England
  • Crime and punishment in early modern England
  • Crime and punishment in eighteenth- and nineteenth century Britain
  • Crime and punishment in modern Britain

 

Parents can find more information on the specific topics covered in each unit by looking at the learning overviews that are stuck into students’ books at the start of each half term.

Overview of Years 10 & 11

The GCSE history course aims to provide students with a broad knowledge of history. Students will cover Medieval to Modern History, and consider countries such as Britain, America, Germany, the USSR and China.  Students study four units: a thematic study, a British depth study, a period study and a modern international depth study.

Year 10 GCSE

Paper 1 (30% of overall grade)

Topic 11: Medicine in Britain, c1250–present and The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries, treatment and the trenches.

c1250-c1500: Medicine in medieval England

  • Ideas about the causes of disease and illness
  • Approaches to prevention and treatment
  • Case study – The Black Death

c1500-c1700: The medical Renaissance in England

  • Ideas about the causes of disease and illness
  • Approaches to prevention and treatment
  • Case studies – William Harvey; The Great Plague

c1700-c1900: Medicine in 18th and 19th century Britain

  • Ideas about the causes of disease and illness
  • Approaches to prevention and treatment
  • Case studies – Jenner; The fight against Cholera

c1900-present: Medicine in modern Britain

  • Ideas about the causes of disease and illness
  • Approaches to prevention and treatment
  • Case studies – Penicillin; the fight against Lung cancer

The British sector on the Western Front, 1914-1918

  • The context of the British sector on the Western Front
  • Conditions requiring medical treatment on the Western Front
  • The Work of the RAMC and FANY
  • The significance of the Western Front for experiments in surgery

Paper 2 (worth 20%)

Topic B1: Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c1060-88

Anglo-Saxon England and the Norman Conquest, 1060-66

  • Anglo-Saxon Society
  • The last years of Edward the Confessor and the succession crisis
  • The rival claimants for the throne
  • The Norman invasion

William I in power: securing the kingdom, 1066-87

  • Establishing control
  • The causes and outcomes of Anglo-Saxon resistance, 1069-71
  • The legacy of resistance to 1087
  • Revolt of the Earls, 1075

Norman England, 1066-88

  • The Feudal System and the Church
  • Norman Government
  • The Norman aristocracy
  • William I and his sons

 

Year 11 GCSE

Paper 2 (worth 20%)

Topic P4: Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-91

The origins of the Cold War, 1941-58

  • Early tension between East and West
  • The development of the Cold War
  • The Cold War intensifies

Cold War Crises, 1958-70

  • Increased tension between East and West
  • Cold War crises
  • Reaction to crisis

The End of the Cold War, 1970-91

  • Attempts to reduce tension between East and West
  • Flashpoints
  • The collapse of Soviet control of Eastern Europe

 

Paper 3 (30% of overall grade)

Topic 31: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-1939

The Weimar Republic, 1918-29

  • The origins of the Republic, 1918-19
  • The early challenges to the Weimar Republic, 1919-23
  • The recovery of the Republic, 1924-29
  • Changes in society, 1924-29

Hitler’s rise to power, 1919-33

  • Early development of the Nazi party, 1920-22
  • The Munich Putsch and the lean years, 1923-29
  • The growth in support for the Nazis, 1929-32
  • How Hitler became chancellor, 1932-33

Nazi control and dictatorship, 1933-29

  • The creation of a dictatorship, 1933-34
  • The police state
  • Controlling and influencing attitudes
  • Opposition, resistance and conformity

Life in Nazi Germany

  • Nazi policies towards women
  • Nazi policies towards the young
  • Employment and living standards
  • The persecution of minorities

We follow the Edexcel specification at GCSE.  A comprehensive overview of the GCSE course curriculum can be accessed here: https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/History/2016/specification-and-sample-assessments/GCSE_History_(9-1)_Specification_Issue_2.pdf

 

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

The History department aims to provide a variety of extra-curricular opportunities to students.  This has included in the past visits from key speakers such as MPs and survivors of the Holocaust.  The department also facilitates entrance to national essay writing competitions, as well as trips to key historical sites such as Kenilworth castle and Berlin.  Every year, the department delivers assemblies that expose students to key events such as Black History Month, Remembrance Day and Holocaust Memorial Day.